Residential properties - Vigo Road

This page lists the residential properties in Vigo Road which runs in a south-westerly direction from the top of Stansted Hill, through the centre of Faiseat, and finishes at the crossroads with the Gravesend Road and Vigo Hill.
Please get in touch with the Society should you have further information on any of the properties listed or suggest any alterations or additions.

Thanet Dene

Originally one of the show homes at a pre WW2 Ideal Homes exhibition and bought by Jim and Fanny Slade, it was re erected on land belonging to The Dairy Farm and was subsequently sold as a separate dwelling to Don and Alice Osborne.

The Dairy Farm

The farm house and buildings were constructed sometime between 1867 and 1895. It was a dairy farm for most of its life and was run by the Burgess family. A barn which was part of the main farm building was separated off as a separate dwelling in 1982/3 and is now known as The Coach House.

The Coach House

Previously a barn associated with The Dairy Farm was converted in 1982/3 to provide a ground floor granny annexe, a bedroom on the first floor and a self-contained 3-bedroomed dwelling.

Underpine Cottage

The property was originally a stables/ store/ garage within the grounds of Fairseat Lodge, then, in 1991, a granny annexe for the elderly mother of the owner of the Lodge. When no longer needed for that purpose, it was rented out, but remained within the curtilage and ownership of the Lodge and did not have its own entrance from the road. In 2007 a Lawful Development Certificate was obtained to separate the annexe from the Lodge. The building on the site in 2019 was demolished and completely replaced.

Fairseat Lodge

Fairseat Lodge and Fairseat Cottage started life as outbuildings of the girl’s school at Fairseat House and were probably built at the same time as the school (1835). It became known as Fairseat Lodge before 1901 and was used as a Coachman’s house and a stable block. Mrs. Pitt (the former owner of Fairseat House) lived there from 1935 to 1954. It became a separate property from Fairseat House in 1954 when it was bought by John and Charmian Stacpoole who lived there for the next 30+ years.

Fairseat Cottage

Fairseat Lodge and Fairseat Cottage started life as outbuildings of the girl’s school at Fairseat House and were probably built at the same time as the school (1835). The property was used as a coach house and harness room before parts of it became a dwelling some time around 1900. The Fairseat Post Office operated from the building from about 1871 to 1930 when it moved to what is now known as the Old Post House (behind Fairseat pond). The old hayloft in the premises was used as an HQ for Fairseat Scouts during and after WW2. The premises were sold in 1965 and it has been a self contained house since then and, for many years was the home of Adrien and Glenys Sturgeon.

Fairseat House

The house was built in 1835 by Horace and Hannah Grant (cousins) and was enlarged with further additions in about 1850. They also built Court House at the same time as a home for Horace. Fairseat House was run by Hannah as a Boarding School for about 50 young ladies until 1863 when it was bought by Major General John Kemball as a family home and it was he who built the wall around the kitchen garden. The Pitt family were in residence from 1914 until 1935 and from 1935 to 1985 Hugh and Grisell Pasteur were owners. From 1871 to 1930 the local Post Office operated from the coach house on the premises whcih is now Fairseat Cottage. In 1935 a large wing and kitchen block, which were part of the original school, were demolished and another wing was reduced in height. The house was Grade II listed in 1984 and was considerably improved in the late 1990s, including a new roof and the addition of a substantial orangery.

Court House

Known as ‘The Cottage’ for most of its life this house was built in 1835 at the same time as Fairseat House. Horace Grant lived there until his death in 1859 while his cousin Hannah was owner/headmistress of the girl’s school at nearby Fairseat House. Hannah’s sister, Elizabeth, was married to William Hickson (Snr) who had lived at Fairseat Manor. The house passed through many hands, including Major Drummond who died there in 1916. The Sheldon family bought the house in 1954 and live there still. A barn in the garden was been converted into The Woolpack Barn in 2019/20 and in 2021/22 a self-contained dwelling called The Courtyard has been formed from part of the main house.

Woolpack Barn

An existing barn built in the 1980’s on the farmland associated with Court House was converted into a residential property named The Woolpack Barn in 2019/20 and the construction and renovation of the barn conversion was featured in the TV programme ‘Grand Designs’. The link below is to an article in Grand Designs Magazine published in April 2021.

The Old Post House

To be completed

Court House Farm

To be completed

Daisy Cottage

To be completed

Fairseat Farmhouse

To be completed

Fairseat Manor

The current building comprises a front elevation of the early 1700s with a much older building behind it. The building and the garden wall facing Vigo Road were Grade II* listed in 1952. The listing says that the original building dates from the 17th century but it could well be much older. The Georgian facade and high garden wall were added by John Cox after he has bought the older building from Sir Roger Twisden.

Staples Cottage

To be completed

Soranks Manor

The house now known as Soranks Manor was built in the mid-1850s and stands on the foundations of a much earlier, medieval manor house. The land associated with the original Manor was held by Ralph de Sandwich during the reign of Henry III and was later passed to Edmund Sorank whose name is recorded in the assize roll of 1313 as a juror for Stansted. Hasted records the Manor as covering some 140 acres in 1548. Soranks Manor was the home of Ada Berry after whom the almshouses in Tumblefield Road are dedicated. Before WW2 the house was owned by Miss Coomber who ran it as a guest house/ hotel until she died in about 1945.

Fairlight Lodge

To be completed

Byways

To be completed

Meadow House

This was originally the staff quarters for Soranks Manor. It was a two-storey timber-framed building on a brick plinth, with timber walls and a corrugated iron roof. Over the years the use became a coach house/ barn and access was from existing secondary access to Soranks Manor. In 2006 planning consent was given to convert the property into a three-bedroom house of the same size, with its own access from Vigo Road.

Soranks Cottage

To be completed

Woodbine Farm

In 1841 this was a smallholding of 3.6 acres and was called Woodlawn Farm. It was occupied by William Goodwin and comprised a house and garden, a meadow and some arable land. Today the farm comprises some 28 acres of land and in the 1980s was used to grow most types of soft fruit and was a piggery for a period. Current uses are equestrian stables and fields, caravan storage and industrial units along Crabtree Close. The land includes the site of a medieval manor which could be the original Soranks Manor.

Woodbine Farm Bungalow

Previously a timber barn with a tin roof this was converted into a bungalow in 2018/19 by Mr George Fowler, the owner of Woodbine Farm, for his personal use.

The Old Rectory

Originally called Woodbine Cottage this house was sold to The Anglo Saxon Friendly Society in 1898 who used it as a convalescent home for its members. It was used a Rectory for Stansted Church from 1968 to 1996 when it was sold. Prior to this part of its garden had been sold and a new house (Langara) was constructed.

Waterlow Cottage

This property and the adjoining Oliver’s Cottage were built by Sir Philip Waterlow in the late 1920s as farm workers cottages attached to Corner Farm (which he also owned). It was used as the local police house either side of WW2 and was called 2 New Cottages until the early 1980s.

Olivers Cottage

This property and the adjoining Waterlow Cottage were built by Sir Philip Waterlow in the late 1920s as farm workers cottages attached to Corner Farm (which he also owned). The local midwife and nurse, Evelyn Oliver lived here for over 30 years and its name changed from 1 New Cottages after she moved away after 1955.

Langara

The house was built in 1997 in the bottom half of the garden of the Old Rectory.

Linton

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Brentwood

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Wayside

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Hawthorns

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Shambley Cottage

To be completed

Squirrel Trees

To be completed

Mayfield

To be completed

The Ridings

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Oakland

This is one of six semi-detached houses built by Fred Waters just before WW2.

Karistova

To be completed

Woodview

One of three identical bungalows built by Fred Waters in 1938 (along with Oakwood Cottage and Brighthill).

Brighthill

One of three identical bungalows built by Fred Waters in 1938 (along with Oakwood Cottage and Woodview). Occupied by the Hills family since new.

Cherry Hay

To be completed

The Herons

To be completed

Oakwood Farm Cottage

One of three identical bungalows built by Fred Waters in 1938 (along with Brighthill and Woodview). Rebuilt in 2017/18 after Oakwood Farm was redeveloped.

1b Oakwood Farm (Pear Tree Cottage)

This detached house and its neighbour (Apple Wood Corner) was newly built in 2018 on the site of the bungalow of the owners of Oakwood Egg Farm, Robert and Lyndsey Durrant.

1a Oakwood Farm (Apple Wood)

This detached house and its neighbour (Pear Tree Cottage) was newly built in 2018 on the site of the bungalow of the owners of Oakwood Egg Farm, Robert and Lyndsey Durrant.

Oak Tree Stables

The current house and two mobile homes for traveller families were built in 2019/21 on a vacant field. A planning inspector decided in 2022 that the builds could remain for the lifetime of the then-current occupants.

Whitecroft

To be completed

3 Manor Cottages

To be completed

2 Manor Cottages

To be completed

1 Manor Cottages

To be completed

Manor Farm

To be completed

Threipmure

To be completed

Pinewitch

The property was the local Police house until 1968

Wentshaw

To be completed